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What’s a Squeeze Page, and Do You Need One?

Posted by admin

October 29, 2020    |     5-minute read (855 words)

Although many companies have great landing pages, they may also benefit from incorporating a squeeze page into their website. A squeeze page is a landing page designed to capture email addresses, webinar registrations or other reactions, but you can also collect users’ names. They typically focus on one product and have one call to action (CTA) to get the user's information.

While you can host many different types offer types on your squeeze page, some will provide more conversions than others. You can use a squeeze page to offer a free e-book, email course, white paper, blog post or subscription to a podcast in exchange for the user’s email address. A squeeze page does not typically lead to other pages unless the user provides their email or closes the page.

The information on your squeeze page should be configured in a way that it is easy to find and read. The squeeze page design includes four main components:

  • A headline that clearly defines the benefit of the product or service.
  • Supporting text that gives enough information to make a decision.
  • A CTA that typically includes just one or two fields (such as name and email address).
  • Appealing visuals and media elements to encourage visitors to read the content. Images are always recommended for an engaging website experience.

There are two common forms of a squeeze page: a splash page and a pop-up page. However, you can choose how to format your squeeze page.

  1. Pop-Up Page: A pop-up page overlays an existing web page to collect email details. Once the reader provides the email or closes the pop-up squeeze page, they can go back to the original page. Although a pop-up page blocks the content that users want to see, the offer can drive users to fill in their details.
  2. Splash Page: Splash pages are custom pages that users are sent to when they first visit your homepage. These pages can help you get more views on your offer. You can also include a “no thanks” button to let your users head straight to your homepage.

Why You Should Have a Squeeze Page

Many businesses use squeeze pages (to collect email addresses) for a good start and then capture more information through other marketing campaigns. Squeeze pages provide some key benefits when compared to typical landing pages, such as:

Generate More Leads – There are fewer distractions on a squeeze page, allowing readers to focus on completing the form. Thus, it improves the prospect of generating more leads.

  • Focused Content – The information on a squeeze page is concise and direct. It focuses on one CTA or topic and does not include any link or navigation options other than filling out a form.
  • Higher Conversion Rate – A well-implemented squeeze page can increase your conversion rate significantly. Since they have minimal data capture fields, they tend to convert more people than other landing pages do.
  • Easy to Create and Load – Squeeze pages are simple to create and easy to turn into templates due to their minimal text and design. Therefore, the squeeze landing pages load faster.
  • Help Promoting New Products and Services – If your offer is valuable to the user, they can subscribe to your marketing emails or messages. Thus, a good offer can help you build a positive relationship with visitors.

How You Can Optimize Your Squeeze Page

Below are the best practices that every entrepreneur should consider to get the most conversions out of their squeeze pages:

Make Your CTA Interactive

Your CTA button should clearly define the action or offer for the user. Also, the design of the squeeze page needs to be such that it highlights the email input field.

Include Limited Content

The content of a squeeze page should be targeted and compelling. It should include minimal text, formatted in bullet points to make content fast and easy to read. Also, avoid any web links on your squeeze page to remove distractions.

Provide Compelling Offers

A convincing and competitive offer can lead to more conversions. Use a more relevant button text to promote the payoff and emphasize the benefits of your offer.

Use Shorter Page Length

Typically, a squeeze landing page should be no more than two- to three-page folds to make the page light and reduce users' effort.

Social Media Compatibility

Your squeeze landing page’s dimensions and layout should be compatible with the social media platform's requirements. In addition, avoid dynamic design layout to increase load speed.

Follow up with Users

Squeeze pages are typically followed by autoresponder email to provide users with offers the moment they fill out your form. Add leads that come through your squeeze page to your email marketing list. Then, you can recommend similar content, offer promotions, or add the users to your newsletter distribution list.

Sync Data to Your Tool

Sync your squeeze page leads to your CRM tool so the leads get automatically routed to your customer database. That way, you can track leads' origins and trigger future campaigns.

Don’t Make an Offer Too Big to Handle

Providing an offer as a limited-time deal can stimulate visitors to take advantage. An offer must be simple to understand with minimum terms and conditions.

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