Blog

Get expert advice on every topic you need as a small business owner, from the ideation stage to your eventual exit. Our articles, quick tips, infographics and how-to guides can offer entrepreneurs the most up-to-date information they need to flourish.

Subscribe to our blog

Leaving Entrepreneurship? How to Go Back to Being an Employee

Posted by Shivali Anand

March 9, 2021    |     4-minute read (717 words)

Sometimes the launch of a business doesn’t work out, and the best option to earn a living requires finding a new job opportunity. You are far from alone, as data show that about 80 percent of new businesses fail within the first 10 years. But being an entrepreneur requires different skills from being an employee. Entrepreneurship makes people think and act like leaders, but as employees at a new job, they are expected to be team players and to leave their business-owner hat behind.

To be sure, starting a regular job after entrepreneurship can be tough, but the process can be eased with a bit of preparation. Consider these points before stepping into the working world as an employee:

  1. Cautiously Construct Your Story:When transitioning from entrepreneur to employee, be ready for both traditional interview questions and some surrounding why you closed your business. Devote a good amount of time to preparing yourself to confidently answer such questions, ranging from your background to leaving your business, as the employer needs to trust your ability to work as part of a team. It is good practice to be truthful about your entrepreneurship experience, but also to frame your answers in an appropriate manner suited to a hiring professional in search of a new team member. Expressing gratitude that you had an opportunity to try entrepreneurship and learned something new during the process will resonate with the interviewer, but negativity or blaming others for your business closure is apt to deter an employer.
  2. Rationally Evaluate Your Fit: Always go through the job description carefully, as you want to avoid being stuck at the wrong place. Do thorough research and look for opportunities that match your interest as well as positions where you would be a good fit. Avoid the temptation to ignore potential warning signs in the rush to find the perfect job. Instead, think deeply before joining. Take time out and reinvent yourself from being an employer to starting as an employee.
  3. Present Your Value with Confidence: It is essential to understand your worth and to value your skills before agreeing to a job interview. If you convey with confidence that you can do certain things better than anyone else, then the hiring manager will believe it too.
  4. Concentrate on Getting Recruited: Prepare yourself with the mindset that you can easily adjust to working efficiently in a team setting. When transitioning from entrepreneur to an employee, make sure you are ready to be a worker in someone else’s company rather than being your own boss. If you are not fully committed and harbor resistances to being a part of a team, odds are high that that your interviewer will pick up on it and cancel your candidacy.
  5. Refine Your Resume:To start applying for jobs, the utmost requirement is a polished resume. Revamp yours to incorporate the achievements, skills and qualifications that make you the best fit for a position. Be sure to use keywords to show the hiring manager at a glance that you are a top candidate for the job.
  6. Play Down Your Role as Entrepreneur or Enterprise Founder:While looking for job opportunities, consider toning down your entrepreneurship experience. The best way to win over a prospective employer is to establish your keenness to learn more and to serve as part of an organization rather than emphasizing your experience as a founder or owner. Instead, describe the roles you played at your company, such as managing or supervising.
  7. Stress Your Desire to Work as Part of a Team:While you can mention your company ownership, the importance of showing the employer that you are eager to work in a team cannot be overstated. Stress your desire to work with others toward a common goal and achieve success for the company. To reiterate, hiring professionals are looking for somebody who will be dedicated to working as a part of the company, and the interview allows you to demonstrate you are that person. 8. Tally Your Achievements and Budding Value as A Worker: Minimizing your entrepreneurship experience doesn’t mean you should omit your achievements. Call out your accomplishments in your resume as well as in interviews to stand out. By emphasizing challenges that you’ve overcome, your value as a potential employee is strengthened.

We handle your essential business offerings so you can focus on growth.